book meme

WWW Wednesday | 14 Jul

Welcome back to WWW Wednesday, which is hosted by Sam at Taking on a World of Words and the three Ws to be answered are:

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you recently finish reading?
  • What do you think you’ll read next?

What are you currently reading?

Scenes of a Graphic Nature by Caroline O'Donoghue | Hachette UK

I’m currently reading Scenes of a Graphic Nature by Caroline O’Donoghue. I actually picked this up because I’d been listening to her Sentimental in the City podcast with Dolly Alderton, and was interested to see what her writing is like.

Scenes of a Graphic Nature follows lost 20-something Charlie, who feels like the world (and her friend, Laura) are passing her by and moving on while she is stuck in the same place, due to a disappointing career and the stress of her father’s illness. Charlie grew up in England, but has been recording her Irish father’s memories over the course of his illness – and when she gets the chance to visit her ancestral home, she jumps at it. however, Charlie soon starts to discover that maybe her dad wasn’t telling the truth about a tragedy that happened to him when he was a child, and so she starts to dig into it.

I’m about 1/3 of the way through this novel, and I’m enjoying the writing style – it’s very readable. Charlie isn’t necessarily that likeable, but not in a bad way; I think she’s got a lot of growing to do, which hopefully we’ll see over the course of the book. I also wonder if there are too many threads (the conspiracy around the tragedy in her dad’s past seems out of place at the moment) – but again, maybe they will all link beautifully by the end!

What did you recently finish reading?

When She Was Good - Cyrus Haven (Paperback)

I finished When She Was Good by Michael Robotham as part of the Tandem Collective readalong (this was gifted to me by Tandem and the publishers, but all views are my own). I enjoyed this book – I found it gripping, and I thought the characters were well written. However, I didn’t find the relationship between the two main characters (Evie and Cyrus) very convincing – there was a lot of telling us they were very close, but not much showing us. I also thought the ending was rushed and wrapped up too quickly. I’ll write a full review soon but I think this will probably be 3 stars.

I also recently finished House of Earth and Blood by Sarah J. Maas, which I really enjoyed – you can see my review here – and Animal by Lisa Taddeo, which I still need to write a full review on.

What do you think you’ll read next?

I don’t know yet! I’ve been reading less ‘serious’ or heavy books recently because that’s just what I’ve felt like, and now I feel ready to sink my teeth into something a bit more serious. My favourite books of the year so far have been: Homegoing, Pachinko, Transcendent Kingdom and The Manningtree Witches. I would really like to read something with similar vibes/style to any of those books – does anyone have any recommendations? Thank you in advance!

book review

Review: The Wolf and the Woodsman by Ava Reid

The Wolf and the Woodsman by Ava Reid | Waterstones

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Genre: Adult Fantasy

Publisher: Del Rey

When the Holy Order of the Woodsmen arrive at a pagan village hidden by the forest, they are there to take a seer for their weak, power-hungry king. But the village has a plan – they will send Évike, the only girl without magic in the village, in the place of the seer. But Évike soon learns that there is more to fear than the king – such as his strong, pious pagan-hating second son, who wants the throne for himself so he can cast out all pagans, and the feelings she develops for a seemingly cold, one-eyed Woodsman on the journey to the castle.

The Wolf and the Woodsman is a beautiful fantasy novel inspired by Hungarian history and Jewish folklore. This novel at times felt like a celebration of Jewish culture and religion. It was brilliant to see such heartfelt representation of a much under-represented group in fiction – and I think this element will feel incredibly important and moving to a lot of people. It was great to see such representation, and to read something a bit different/learn more about other cultures.

The world building in this novel is truly amazing – Reid creates such a magical yet brutal world. It feels equally like a fantastically magical fairytale and like something that mirrors the pages of our history books, as she tackles the dark and complex themes of nation building, ethnic cleansing, cultural genocide and religious persecution. To do all of this (and to do it well and sensitively) within one book in which she also builds a highly detailed world and complex, lovable characters is quite the feat and I’m in awe of how much she got done in one book.

Reid brings this novel and the characters to life with beautiful, lyrical, haunting prose. I loved Évike, who was spiky, determined and holding on to a lot of hurt. Gáspár, the love interest, is complex and nuanced and I loved the way he developed over the course of the novel. The world is so well crafted and the novel was gripping – I felt completely immersed in it when I was reading, and I didn’t want to stop.

There’s so much to love about this novel and I highly, highly recommend that you pick it up! Through gorgeous prose, Reid created an unforgettable world and cast of characters, and I’m excited to see what she will do next!

book meme

WWW Wednesday | 12 May

Me? Doing a WWW Wednesday post two weeks in a row? Is it a miracle? I hope everyone’s doing well and that, if you’re in the UK, you’ve been enjoying some of the lockdown easing. I can’t believe we’re able to hug people next week! Mad, isn’t it? I will be exercising caution and won’t be going around madly hugging anyone and everyone, but when I do see my family again I will be giving them an extra tight squeeze! Anyway, on to the books…

As always, WW Wednesday is hosted by Sam at Taking on a World of Words and the three Ws to be answered are:

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you recently finish reading?
  • What do you think you’ll read next?

What are you currently reading?

The First Woman by Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi. I’m not too far into yet – maybe 6 chapters or so, and I think it’s so interesting and the writing is really gripping. It’s set in Uganda in the 1970s and tells the story of Kirabo. When we meet her, Kirabo is about 12 years old, but this is supposed to be a coming of age novel, so I assume she’ll grow up as we read. What I’m loving about this novel so far is how it transports you to Uganda and immerses you in the history, language, culture and mythology. It can trip you up a couple of times, if you’re not used to reading about the culture, but I like that – why should the novel pander to the Western reader?

What did you recently finish reading?

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I finished The Little Stranger by Sarah Waters a couple of days ago. I gave it four stars in my review – I thought it was compelling and atmospheric, but it was a little bit too long. It was my first Sarah Waters novel and I do think I would like to read more by her – any recommendations?

What do you think you’ll read next?

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As I mentioned last week, I have Cunning Women by Elizabeth Lee to review, which I would really like to get to soon – and which I’ve heard really good things about!

The Little Stranger and The First Woman are both quite long reads, so I think I would like to read something a bit shorter next. I mentioned The Divines last week, which is still a possibility, or maybe I will mix things up and go with a YA read. I have A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder, which isn’t short but I think will be quite a quick read.

I also have some Audible credits to use up. I usually only listen to nonfiction books, but I would like to go out of my comfort zone and try a fiction book. I’m working from home by myself most of the time at the moment, so I think I could get some good listening time in. Does anyone have any good fiction audiobook recommendations? I have no idea how to tell what will make a good audiobook, really!

Uncategorized

WWW Wednesday | 5 May

Hi all and welcome back for another WWW Wednesday, hosted by Sam at Taking on a World of Words. I really enjoy doing these as I feel like my reading rate has slowed down a bit so I don’t have as many reviews to post – but it means I can still check in with you all!

So, the three Ws to be answered are:

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you recently finish reading?
  • What do you think you’ll read next?

What are you currently reading?

The Little Stranger: shortlisted for the Booker Prize: Amazon.co.uk: Sarah  Waters: 9781844086061: Books

The Little Stranger by Sarah Waters. This is a ghost story set in a crumbling 1940s mansion. This is my first Sarah Waters book and I’m really enjoying it so far! It feels quite Shirley Jackson-esque to me, though much, much longer – I think my edition is about 500 pages? It’s a real slow-burn; I’m about half-way through and most people are still not admitting there’s any form of haunting happening. So it’s definitely not for people who love a fast-paced plot! However, I’m really enjoying getting to know the characters and experiencing the post-war world and class struggles that Sarah Waters is depicting.

One of the things I loved about The Haunting of Hill House (review linked) is her use of terror – it’s the anticipation of something bad happening, rather than the actually bad thing, that’s truly scary. And I can definitely see hints of that in this book, which I’m really enjoying – so I’m hoping the second half of the novel can keep me as transfixed and happy as the first!

What did you recently finish reading?

Since my last WWW Wednesday post (4 weeks ago!), I have finished four books:

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  • The Sanatorium by Sarah Pearse, which I was enjoying when I last wrote one of these posts, but which I ended up giving only 2 stars to. I found it disappointing, especially the reveal at the end.
  • The Manningtree Witches by A.K. Blakemore – I absolutely adored this book! Wonderfully written, really clever and poignant. I gave this five stars and I definitely recommend you read my review then pick it up!
  • Ariadne by Jennifer Saint – this was a NetGalley ARC, and I haven’t posted my review for this one yet, but I really didn’t enjoy it. It’s a ‘Greek retelling’ of Ariadne (who appears in the Minotaur myth – she’s the Minotaur’s sister), but I found this novel really boring and dry. It’s supposed to retell the myth from Ariadne’s point of view, but it does that quite literally – not adding anything new or giving her more agency or a different role to the original myths depict. I found it a real disappointment as I was very much looking forward to it.
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  • Sadie by Courtney Summers – this book is told partly by first-person accounts from Sadie, and partly through transcripts of a podcast that is investigating her disappearance. I thought this was well-written and I read most of it in one go, but it is an incredibly bleak novel with no lighter moments to balance it out. It felt like Summers had thought ‘what are all the bad things that could ever happen’ and then made them all happen to Sadie. I’m not adverse to gritty, realistic or dark novels (in fact, they are usually my favourite kind), but this was too much for me.
  • What do you think you’ll read next?

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    I have no idea… my TBR has really flown out the window in the last couple of months. The Little Stranger was on my February TBR! I think I’ll see what I’m feeling, but potentially The Divines or maybe The First Woman. I also have Cunning Women to review and am really looking forward to it – but wanted to leave enough space after The Manningtree Witches as they are both books about the witch trials in the 1600s.

    book meme

    WWW Wednesday | 31 Mar

    Hi everyone! I’m back with another WWW Wednesday, hosted by Sam at Taking on a World of Words.

    The three Ws to be answered are:

    • What are you currently reading?
    • What did you recently finish reading?
    • What do you think you’ll read next?

    What are you currently reading?

    I’m actually between books right now! I finished Girl A by Abigail Dean the day before yesterday, and I didn’t get a chance to pick anything up yesterday as it was randomly 23 degrees in London and lockdown is finally being eased – so I went out to sit in a friend’s garden. It was my first time seeing someone other than my boyfriend (who I live with) since before Christmas – how surreal is that?!

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    Anyway, I am waiting for a copy of Tall Bones by Anna Bailey to arrive (hopefully today!) and that will be my next read, as part of a Tandem Collective Readalong (so I guess this should be (#gifted). I’ll be posting some stories and content on my instagram as part of the readalong, so feel free to join me over there if you would like to hear more about it! For now, here’s the synopsis:

    When seventeen-year-old Emma leaves her best friend Abi at a party in the woods, she believes, like most girls her age, that their lives are just beginning. Many things will happen that night, but Emma will never see her friend again.

    Abi’s disappearance cracks open the façade of the small town of Whistling Ridge, its intimate history of long-held grudges and resentment. Even within Abi’s family, there are questions to be asked – of Noah, the older brother whom Abi betrayed, of Jude, the shining younger sibling who hides his battle scars, of Dolly, her mother and Samuel, her father – both in thrall to the fire and brimstone preacher who holds the entire town in his grasp. Then there is Rat, the outsider, whose presence in the town both unsettles and excites those around him.

    Anything could happen in Whistling Ridge, this tinder box of small-town rage, and all it will take is just one spark – the truth of what really happened that night out at the Tall Bones…

    What did you recently finish reading?

    Girl A: Abigail Dean on her shocking debut novel that's taking the book  world by storm | Books | The Guardian

    Girl A by Abigail Dean, which was so unexpectedly good! It wasn’t what I expected at all in terms of plot – it was very character-driven, in the best way , and not your typical plot-driven thriller. It follows a girl who escaped from her parents’ house, freeing her younger siblings from their captivity. When we start her story, her mother has just died in prison, causing Lex to have to revisit her past, and through flashbacks and conversations with her siblings, we learn more about what when on in that house. It’s a very dark novel, but it’s not as bleak as I was expecting – and I think Abigail Dean does a very good job of balancing the novel, making it sensitive and not exploitative of trauma.

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    Since my last WWW Wednesday past, I’ve also read Luster by Raven Leilani – review here – and Rescue Me by Sarra Manning, a very sweet rom com about two people who fall in love after starting to co-pawrent a dog. My review is still come.

    What do you think you’ll read next?

    Hmmm, well I still have two books left on my March tbr. These are actually the same two books I put in this section of my post for my last WWW post – I’ve just been mood reading since then. So, I think that I will probably read The Mountains Sing or The Little Stranger next (after Tall Bones), depending on my mood. I’m hoping to get lots of reading done over Easter, so maybe one of these will be in the recently read section this time next week!

    book review

    Luster by Raven Leilani

    Rating: 3 out of 5.
    Luster: Amazon.co.uk: Leilani, Raven: 9781529035988: Books

    Luster is a sharp novel that follows Edie, a young black women, who starts a relationship with an older, white, married man. This is what I would call (and have seen described as) a millennial novel – it’s about a woman who makes pretty disastrous decisions and it’s written in a similar sharp, detached, wry narrative voice as other books I would class a millennial novels.

    For me, though, the sense of detachment from the main character is a problem. I felt a similar thing in Exciting Times, when I was watching the main character making bad decisions. I like unlikeable, flawed characters but I have to understand them and why they made the decisions that they did. And I’m not sure I can say that I understand Edie in Luster, the same way I’m not sure I understood Ava in Exciting Times.

    I do think part of it is that Edie doesn’t understand what she wants, or how to get what she wants, and she’s definitely struggling with a sense of ennui throughout the novel. But she has no fight and just lets a lot of things happen to her – for me, I just really struggled to connect with her.

    There were plenty of things I did like about this book: there’s no doubt that Leilani is an excellent writer, and I loved her style. She creates a beautifully uncomfortable atmosphere, and it makes you not want to look away – you need to read to see what is going to happen next. I loved Edie’s relationship with Akila. I thought there was a lot of potential in Edie’s relationship with Rebecca. Don’t get me started on Eric, who is truly, truly unlikeable in all ways.

    Overall, I’m not sure how much I can say I enjoyed this novel. At times, Leilani’s writing truly sung, but overall the novel felt mostly purposeless, and very morose and bleak. I’ve seen the writing style described as humorous, but I would say that only applies to the first chapter or so. This book wasn’t for me, but I would say that doesn’t mean it’s not for you! If you loved Exciting Times or Such a Fun Age, I can see you getting more out of this book than me.

    wrap up

    February wrap-up

    Happy March, everyone! I’m writing this wrap-up with a lot more optimism than for January’s – I think a combination of the roadmap out of lockdown (it’s nice to have some semblance of a plan!) and the sunny weather has really boosted my mood. I hope the same can be said for you too! It’s been a difficult few months, but hopefully we can see the light at the end of the tunnel now.

    My sister got her vaccine last week, which feels like a huge weight off my shoulders. She’s diabetic and was moved on to the shielding list, and as the older sister it’s my job to worry about her – so this has just been a lovely relief. I love hearing everyone’s vaccination stories, it brings me such joy; I’d love to spend every work meeting with people giving a roundup of everyone they know that has been vaccinated 😂 Anyway, enough about this… on to the books!

    Books I’ve finished this month:

    A book stack in front of a plant and some daffodils.
    The (physical) books I’ve read this month
    • Insatiable by Daisy Buchanan*: This book follows Violet, a woman who is drawn into the dazzling world of an older, richer couple. What follows is a lot of sex and bad decisions. I wanted to like this book, but ended up giving it 2 stars as I felt it lacked depth or any good character development.
    • The Haunting of Alma Fielding by Kate Summerscale: A non-fiction book following the story of a Nandor Fodor (a ghost hunter) and Alma Fielding, who is being haunted in 1930s London. Summerscale is a gifted storyteller and her books are well-researched and always enjoyable. 4 stars.
    • The Confession by Jessie Burton: A split-narrative novel following Elise in 1980s Hollywood and Rose in 2017 London. This novel is beautifully written, with truly authentic and flawed characters – I found it engaging and delightful. 5 stars.
    • Bunny by Mona Awad: I can’t summarise this one in two lines as I don’t really know what happened. Wonderfully bizarre yet perhaps relying too much on its shock factor, this is a book I think you have to read for yourself. 3 stars.
    • The Night Swim by Megan Goldin: A thoughtful and sensitive thriller, following Rachel, a true crime podcaster, as she visits a small town to cover a rape trail. While she’s there, she gets drawn into the case of a girl whose accidental death 20 years ago might not actually be an accident. 4 stars.
    • Get a Life, Chloe Brown by Talia Hibbert: A fun, sweet and steamy romance. I found this refreshing and a very quick read. I’ve not written my review yet, but I would say 4 stars.
    • Pachinko by Min Jin Lee: An amazing, richly-detailed portrait of a Korean family that move to Japan in the 1930s. I absolutely loved it – review to come, but definitely a 5 star read.
    • Hood Feminism by Mikki Kendall: If you are a white woman, you need to read this book. Mikki Kendall discusses the factors that aren’t usually covered by mainstream feminism but should be. It’s a really engaging and well-written collection of essays that will introduce you to intersectional feminism. A must-read, 5 stars.
    • Every Last Fear by Alex Finlay*: This thriller follows the Pine family and deals with two crimes: the murder of Danny Pine’s teenage girlfriend, which he is convicted for, and the deaths of the rest of the Pine family 6 years later. I liked this, but part of it fell flat for me and I didn’t find the characters too convincing. 3 stars.

    My favourite book of the month was probably Pachinko, with The Confession coming a very close second!

    Books I’ve started (but not finished):

    • The Dog Share by Fiona Gibson: This was a dnf for me. The book started with a whole lot of set-up – by the time I put it down (almost 20% of the way in) the book was still setting up the characters and the two main characters (who you know are going to fall in love) hadn’t even met. Not for me!
    • Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasi*: This is my current read! I started it last night, so I’ve not read much, but I’m enjoying it so far.

    (* Thank you to NetGalley and the publishers for a copy of these books in return for an honest review)

    Post round-up:

    Here’s a round-up of my February posts, in case you have missed any and would like to catch up!

    How has your month been? What was your favourite book of the month?

    Let me know in the comments and feel free to leave a link to your own February wrap-up so I can check it out!

    For more of my reviews, connect with me on Goodreads.

    For more pictures of pretty books, follow me on Instagram.

    book review

    Review: Bunny by Mona Awad

    Image result for bunny mona awad

    Rating: 3 out of 5.

    Before I started reading this book, all of the reviews I’d seen said something along the lines of ‘wow, this book was wild/bizarre/strange/unusual etc., etc.’ – so I went into this book knowing that something weird was going to happen, but not knowing what. Like these other reviews, I’m not going to give you more detail about why this is the case, as I think you’re best going into this novel completely fresh and unprepared. This book follows Samantha Mackey, who is studying an MFA at an elite university. She feels like an outsider in her class – she’s poorer, less put together than the ‘Bunnies’, a group of unbearable rich girls who call each other ‘Bunny’. However, at the beginning of the new school year, the Bunnies invite Samantha to one of their ‘Smut Salons’ and from there Samantha is drawn into an utterly bizarre world that she struggles to escape.

    I enjoyed this book, but I would say that I think it relies quite heavily on the ‘what the fuck’ shock value – the turn from slightly unsettling to absolutely absurd comes whiplashingly quickly, and I think the momentum of this reveal carries a lot of the novel from there. It was strange, it kept me reading and I was desperate to figure out what exactly was happening. Did I? Not really. Was I left with more questions than I began with? Yes. Did I enjoy it? I think so?

    The author is undoubtedly talented – this novel is disorientating by design – and she creates such an incredibly close, claustrophobic atmosphere the entire way through to add to your discomfort/confusion. However, I’m not sure that I found the characters convincing – I could accept this for the Bunnies as they are a parody of a group of popular girls (though taken to the nth degree) but I found Samantha lacking in personality. The novel tries to talk about loneliness as a theme, but I found this a bit weak and lost in all of the ‘what the hell is happening’ parts of the story. Samantha also lacks agency, which I believe the story itself actually references, but I found the way she fell in with the Bunnies too quick and easy – and when she starts witnessing weird things happening, she doesn’t doubt or question them, even right at the very beginning.

    I think this would be a very divisive book – I think some people will absolutely love the absurdity of it, I think others will hate it with a passion – but I do actually find myself sitting on the fence with it. I thought it was interesting, I admire the bizarre and ‘wtf’ moments, I like that it’s different – but I also think that past the shock value, there wasn’t as much going for it as I expected, and I did find the main character unlikeable.

    Would I recommend this? I think so, if only so you can read it for yourself and make up your own opinion.

    For more of my reviews, connect with me on Goodreads.

    For pictures of pretty books, follow me on Instagram.

    book review

    Review: The Confession by Jessie Burton

    Rating: 5 out of 5.
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    The Confession is a split narrative novel, following Elise in the 1980s and Rose in 2017.

    When Elise meets acclaimed author Constance Holden in Hampstead Heath, they are drawn to one another – they fall in love and Elise is drawn fully into Connie’s life, following her to LA (where they are making a movie of one of her novels) so that they can be together. Connie thrives in the atmosphere of LA, but Elise does not, feeling herself become increasingly distant from Connie. In 2017, Rose is seeking answers about her mother, who disappeared when she was a child. Her investigations lead her to Connie, now reclusive and living a lonely life in Hampstead; like Elise, Rose is drawn into Connie’s orbit.

    Jessie Burton is an exceptional writer. Her characters are so well developed and they feel so distinctly human. They aren’t caricaturist or surface level – they are well-developed, flawed and authentic. I sometimes find that when stories follow two different timeframes, the characters can become blurred or indistinct, but I didn’t find that the case here. The characters were each unique and recognisable.

    I’ve loved The Miniaturist and The Muse by Jessie Burton, and like these books, Burton’s historical research is meticulous and comes to life on the page. 1980s Hollywood felt as real to me as late 2010s London.

    I felt instantly hooked and drawn into this novel, reading it over two sittings because once I picked it up, I just didn’t want to put it back down. That’s good going for a 400-odd page novel! The prose is beautiful yet understated, and the pacing was really great – I never felt bored or rushed – it was plotted really well.

    There are lots of heavy themes throughout – motherhood, friendship, love, loss, secrets, searching for your own identity – and I think Burton handled them all really well. By the end of the novel I felt a real fondness towards the characters and their struggles, I think because they felt so lifelike and the things that they were struggling for felt so real. This was a truly compelling, engaging read, and I definitely recommend it!

    For more of my reviews, connect with me on Goodreads.

    For pictures of pretty books, follow me on Instagram.

    book meme

    WWW Wednesday | 10 Feb

    Hi everyone! I’m back with another WWW Wednesday, hosted by Sam at Taking on a World of Words.

    The three Ws to be answered are:

    • What are you currently reading?
    • What did you recently finish reading?
    • What do you think you’ll read next?

    What are you currently reading?

    Image result for the confession

    I’m currently reading The Confession by Jessie Burton, which I’m really enjoying. The novel is a split narrative, between Elise in the 1980s and Rose in 2017. Elise meets the acclaimed novelist Constance Holden and falls in love with her, following her to LA (where they are making a movie of her novel) so they can be together. However, while Connie is thriving, Elise is not. In 2017, Rose is seeking answers about her mother, who disappeared when she was younger. Her investigations lead her to ingratiate herself with Constance Holden, who has become reclusive in her old age.

    I really enjoyed both The Miniaturist and The Muse, Jessie Burton’s previous novels, and I’m loving this one so much that I’m wondering why I waited so long to pick it up! Burton has this amazing ability of making all of her characters seem so vividly real.

    What did you recently finish reading?

    Image result for the haunting of alma fielding

    I missed WWW Wednesday last week, so I’ll quickly recap what I’ve read over the last two weeks. I most recently finished The Haunting of Alma Fielding by Kate Summerscale last week, which I very much enjoyed. It wasn’t quite as good as The Suspicions of Mr Whicher, I don’t think, but still really interesting and well-researched.

    Before that, I finished Insatiable by Daisy Buchanan. This was an eARC that I was really looking forward to, but I ended up finding very disappointing. Hopefully I’ll get my review up for that soon!

    And I also read and loved Open Water by Caleb Azumah Nelson, which I have miraculously already written a review for!

    What do you think you’ll read next?

    Image result for bunny mona awad
    Image result for pachinko min jin lee

    I have two more books on my February tbr – Bunny by Mona Awad and Pachinko by Min Jin Lee. I’m looking forward to both of these but don’t know which one I’ll feel like reading most. I’d love to hear your thoughts if you’ve read either of these!

    However, it was my birthday on Monday and was lucky enough to get a few books as presents, including Luster by Raven Leilani and The Mountains Sing by Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai, so I can’t promise I’ll stick to the tbr I set out at the beginning of Feb!

    What are you currently reading? How are you finding it? And what are you planning to read next?